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FAQ
FAQ
FAQ

Q1: Why are there so many AIDS orphans in Central China?

Q2: Doesn't the Chinese Government have some welfare assistance for orphans in general?

Q3: Isn't the Chinese Government doing something for the AIDS orphans already?

Q4: Isn't education free in China already?

Q5: How much do educational fees cost?

Q6: Why should I trust CHF to help these children?

Q7: How can I ensure my donation is going to children impacted by AIDS and not an official or middleman?

 

Q1: Why are there so many AIDS orphans in Central China?

A1: During the 1990s many poor peasants sold blood in Central China to supplement their income. Due to unsanitary blood collection practices many contracted HIV, resulting in hundreds of thousands of their children becoming AIDS orphans today.
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Q2: Doesn't the Chinese Government have some welfare assistance for orphans in general?

A2: Yes, but the definition of an “orphan” in China is a child who has lost both parents. Many of the children impacted by AIDS may have one or both parents dying of AIDS, who are still alive. Therefore, they may not qualify for certain assistance for orphans.
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Q3: Isn't the Chinese Government doing something for the AIDS orphans already?

A3: The Government is becoming increasingly aware of the AIDS orphans issue, and has started to act. However, given the large number of these orphans and their rapidly declining conditions, the government efforts may not reach as many children quickly enough. There are also programs that the Government does not handle, such as educational sponsorships for senior high school students and older, or efforts that requires a lot of personal, hands-on care. This type of work, such as psycho-social care and vocational training, is traditionally better implemented by NGOs.
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Q4: Isn't education free in China already?

4A: In China, tuition is free for the first 9 years of school, from primary school to junior high school (9th grade). However, students are required to pay for their books and other miscellaneous school fees. Chi Heng can help pay these expenses directly to the schools. Chi Heng also sponsors children in senior high school and university that are not subsidized by the government.
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Q5: How much do educational fees cost?

A5: Education fees vary from school to school, and from grade to grade. In general, it costs, on a yearly basis, about (Note 1):

One primary student:   HK$400 (US$55)
One junior high school student: HK$670 (US$90)
One vocational student: HK$4,200 (US$540)
One senior high school student: HK$6,000 (US$780)
One university student: HK$7,500 (US$970)

Note 1: This is estimated average for general reference. Acutal amount varies by school and family conditions.
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Q6: Why should I trust CHF to help these children?

A6: CHF is a registered charity that is subject to legal accounting and compliance procedures. We use independent accountants and independent auditors.
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Q7: How can I ensure my donation is going to children impacted by AIDS and not an official or middleman?

A7: Our staff handles the distribution of all funds, and in the case of educational sponsorships the money goes directly to the schools to pay for the students’ education. Our administrative costs are capped at 20%, which means that all other funds must go to the programs to benefit the children.
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